Closing Luncheon

The Closing Lunch is a project of the Management and Finance Day. CIM and the Management and Economics Society are pleased to confirm their Luncheon's keynote speaker: Mr. Gordon J. Bogden.

Gordon J. Bogden

Mr. Bogden began his professional career as a geophysicist, co-founding Quantec Geoscience, moving on to CIBC, Rothschild, and National Bank Financial as a senior mining investment banker.  He concluded his 22-year investment banking career as Vice Chairman, Mining & Metals, for Standard Chartered Bank after its acquisition of Gryphon Partners in 2011 where he was a Co-Founder and Managing Partner.  Upon retiring from the financial services industry in 2012, he focused on board leadership, strategic development and corporate responsibility initiatives.  He has served as a director of over a dozen public mining companies including Royal Gold Inc., IAMGold, Canplats, International Royalty, Volta Resources, and Nexgen Energy and is currently the Vice-Chairman of the Canada Mining Innovation Council, a member of the Advisory Board of the Development Partner Institute, a member of the Canadian Advisory Board and Executive of Right To Play, and a former member of the Bridgepoint Active Healthcare Foundation Board, and the Mt. Sinai Hospital Foundation Board.  Mr. Bogden is also Chairman of Black Loon Group, a private mining investment company, and is a former President and CEO of Alloycorp Mining Inc. 

Mr. Bogden holds a B.Sc. in Applied Science (Geology) from Queen's University, is a Professional Engineer (Ontario), and earned his professional certification as a Corporate Director (ICD.D) from the Institute of Corporate Directors in Toronto in 2007.

He has also authored and presented many papers on corporate responsibility, corporate strategy, and M&A and capital markets related to the mining industry.

 

 

“The Increasing Cost of Water”

Gordon J. Bogden

ABSTRACT

The vast majority of community-related opposition to mining development around the world is related to water.  “What’s in the water?” is often the first question asked by communities of mining companies where there is fear of contamination of water in regions where water is in abundance.  Conversely, “Don’t take my water!” is voiced by communities in countries or regions where water is scarce and desalination is needed for irrigation and to supply industry. 

Indeed, the question “Who owns the water?”, which has been asked quietly in the past, is now starting to gain volume as communities place more attention on water rights with government, indigenous communities, and industry.  What will be the cost to mining development of such rights? 

While improved stewardship of water resources through initiatives like Goldcorp’s Towards Zero Water initiative along with CMIC’s Towards Zero Waste Mining initiative will give the mining industry a competitive advantage, socially, and practically in the long-term, a key question is, “What are the near-term costs of such initiatives before we see positive economic benefits?”

How our industry answer these questions in the coming decades will be critical to its long-term economic survival.

 

Date & Time: Wednesday, May 9 from 12:00 - 13:45

Management and Finance Day program & lunch: $425

Closing Luncheon only for registered delegates: $75

 

Abstract Submission is now open

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